Rapper DaBaby continues to face major backlash after he went on a homophobic rant while performing at Miami festival Rolling Loud.

In case you missed it, DaBaby drew backlash after he was heard telling the crowd at the festival, “If you didn’t show up today with HIV, AIDS, or any of them deadly sexually transmitted diseases, that’ll make you die in two to three weeks, then put your cellphone lighter up.

“Ladies, if your pussy smell like water, put your cellphone light in the air. Fellas, if you ain’t sucking dick in the parking lot, put your cellphone lighter up.”

While the rap star has already copped a slew of criticism for his wildly inappropriate comments, he attempted to save face by doubling down on his comments via Instagram Stories.

“What I do at a live show is for the audience at the live show. It’ll never translate correctly to somebody looking at a little five, six-second clip from their goddamn crib on their phone. It just don’t work like that,” the rapper said.

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“Because, regardless of what y’all motherfuckers are talking about and how the internet twisted up my motherfucking words, me and all my fans at the show, the gay ones and the straight ones, we turned the fuck up.”

Among those to slam the comments regarding HIV made by DaBaby include activist Amber Rose, and now, the UK’s leading HIV and Aids charity, Terrence Higgins Trust (THT), who said that the rapper’s comments “perpetuate HIV-related stigma and discrimination, as well as spreading misinformation about HIV.”

“It’s wrong for people living with HIV to be made to feel lesser or excluded because of their diagnosis – it should be unacceptable in the music industry and in society at large,” said Richard Angell, THT’s campaigns director.

“Comments like DaBaby’s perpetuate HIV-related stigma and discrimination, as well as spreading misinformation about HIV,” he continued.

“You can now live a long, healthy life with HIV thanks to medical progress when you’re diagnosed and accessing treatment.”

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